Why Log & Timber Frame?

Logs and heavy timbers used in home construction create an ambiance unlike any other building styles. The best way I know how to introduce one to the splendor of logs is to point you to an article I wrote about this very subject entitled, “The Norman Rockwell Effect”.

Logs for home construction can be round, D-shaped or squared. They may be machined to interlock with each other, stacked one atop of the other and cut (coped, or Swedish cope) to fit its corresponding mate, or they can be irregular and “chinked” for a snug and weather tight fit. Log siding is also a popular way of making a stick-built house look like a real log cabin. Another facet of log-style construction is a very old practice called timber framing…

Timber Framing

Timber frame (or timberframe) is one of the oldest traditions of constructing wooden structures. Just like fine furniture uses dovetails, mortise and tenons and old-world joinery, timber framing is a sophisticated method of “post and beam” joinery that uses wooden pegs in place of steel hardware as fasteners. This art form dates back to early Grecian times and remained the principal method of building construction until the advent of “stick framing” in the mid-eighteenth century.

Modern craftsman carry on this unique timber frame construction creating homes, barns, shops, hotels and churches. Timber framing has experienced a revival in today’s home building as people rediscover this beautiful and functional method of construction.